Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

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The Outcast
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby The Outcast » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:36 pm

WOW, that 1960s console looks damn good. I wish I could actually paint and had a 3D printer, so that I could do stuff like that.

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SomeCleverReference
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby SomeCleverReference » Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:50 pm

Well, I would probably be posting pictures of my finished TVM TARDIS, but now I'm having to reprint it. I had put the thing together, slotted the walls in, basically got it all ready to be primed and painted, and then I leave it for a few minutes. In that time it must have decided it was close enough to being complete and dematerialized, only to rematerialize about 3 feet up (almost as if it fell off that table because I was stupid and left it too close to the edge of the table, which is odd, because I'd never do that). This broke the main part of it completely, and damaged the walls so bad that they also need to be reprinted. Let this be a lesson after you print one: it is not capable of flying, and it's probably best not to try.

However, this at least gave me time to realize that the tiny little door handle is way too small to get a grip on to make the doors close, and I needed a better solution.

If you've ever disassembled a CO TARDIS, you know how the doors open with a complex spring-loaded thing. Well, my solution is a little simpler, but it should still work. Here's my latest creation, which uses this design: the undisguised form of a post-Type-40 TARDIS, as seen in Hell Bent

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As you can (hopefully) see in the second picture, I made it so the cylinders on the edge of the doors actually go through the floor, and included two lever things on the bottom, which is hollowed out. The idea is to sandwich the base of the TARDIS in between this handle and the door itself as tightly as possible, so that it's still movable, but won't flap about wildly.

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This is the simplest thing I've ever made I think, with just 6 pieces.
I'm also working on a Type 40 as seen in The Name of the Doctor, but it's not quite done yet and I won't print it until after I print this one (Type 41? I'm not sure, it's never stated in the episode as far as I can remember)

Once I get the Hell Bent TARDIS right, I can finally have something that I can actually put up as a final version, instead of a constant "under revision" stage. Once it's ready for printing I'll put it on google drive or dropbox and link it here and the description on Tinkercad, since apparently people are having issues with getting them out of tinkercad.

Fingers crossed that this prints perfectly first time and I can just adapt the design for the handles under the doors to all the other TARDISes easily.

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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby Racks42 » Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:27 pm

I’m very very envious about everyone’s 3D modeling skills in here, I’m just here making the base tardises it of Knock off Lidl Pringles tubes :lol: :lol: :lol:

Also I wish they would update this site to allow actual emojis I’m missing my crying laughing emoji
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SomeCleverReference
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby SomeCleverReference » Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:45 pm

Racks42 wrote:I’m very very envious about everyone’s 3D modeling skills in here, I’m just here making the base tardises it of Knock off Lidl Pringles tubes :lol: :lol: :lol:

Also I wish they would update this site to allow actual emojis I’m missing my crying laughing emoji


This particular model isn't even hard to do, it took me maybe 2 hours to finish the whole thing. It's literally just squares and cylinders, this is probably the easiest thing I'll ever make. Honestly Tinkercad is super easy to use, which makes it possible for even a moron like me to make things like this. There's a little bit of a learning curve to it, but after a while you figure it out. A lot of the time it's more a logic puzzle than anything else, with "hmm how will I make this thing? I know, I'll use these shapes. Now how will I get it to align perfectly? I know, I'll build a box of the right height, then use the align tool and align it to the edge of the box."

There are also a few shortcuts that are bafflingly not explained anywhere (I only learned them when I stumbled upon their youtube page which just had them as part of the videos as if you were supposed to know them already) which make it easier to use, like F to focus on the selected object.

It's nowhere near as complicated as something like Blender, which gives me a headache trying to learn. As far as I can tell there's no way to easily align things in Blender, which means despite being an infinitely better program, it's pretty useless for me when it comes to 3D printing. I can't even import files from Tinkercad because somehow its vertices are completely different than Blender's and I can't use them that way.

It does seem to be good for modelling irregular shapes that I don't have measurements for though, like the telepathic circuits on 12's console. But from past experience, I'd be willing to bet that Tinkercad can't import the files made in blender somehow because of some stupid reason.

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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby TheSparrow » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:11 pm

Racks42 wrote:Also I wish they would update this site to allow actual emojis I’m missing my crying laughing emoji

What. A. Mood.
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby Deborah J » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:25 pm

Racks42 wrote:I’m very very envious about everyone’s 3D modeling skills in here, I’m just here making the base tardises it of Knock off Lidl Pringles tubes :lol: :lol: :lol:

Also I wish they would update this site to allow actual emojis I’m missing my crying laughing emoji

When I was 13 or 14 I tried to make a model of the tardis out of a tropicana carton, after they did one on blue peter, but I couldn't get any blue paint, and it was suppost to fold out like the dapol tardis to have the inside inside, and the console would be made from the top of a 2 litre botle, bever quite got it, but then a few years later they did a better tardis inside model, and I actually made the whole thing of that, I got a silver blue peter badge for sending a photo of it finished. After I got the proper model though I recycled the cardboard one into other things. Shame, really, it was quite good, I do still have the pieces somewhere, the console was turned into a variation on the post office tower for model shots in a video that never got made.

So yeah, the blue peter style method of making stuff out of rubbish will always win my heart more, even when these guys make amazing mind blowing 3d creations, if you make a Resolution dalek out of a toilet roll and a tennis ball then I'm going to be like "aww"
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby Racks42 » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:56 pm

TheSparrow wrote:
Racks42 wrote:Also I wish they would update this site to allow actual emojis I’m missing my crying laughing emoji

What. A. Mood.



See this would be where I use said emoji... big mood, big big mood
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby TheSparrow » Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:00 am

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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby skifflebits » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:25 am

Am I the only one who can't read the name "Blue Peter" without snickering?

I'll concede I'm the only one who hear's it sung to the tune of "Blue Christmas" by Elvis Presley.

"I'll have a Bluuuuue Peter... without youuuuuu..."

:)
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Re: Some Clever Reference's 3D Printable TARDISes (and Occasional Customs)

Postby bluehinter » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:37 am

SomeCleverReference wrote:This particular model isn't even hard to do, it took me maybe 2 hours to finish the whole thing. It's literally just squares and cylinders, this is probably the easiest thing I'll ever make. Honestly Tinkercad is super easy to use, which makes it possible for even a moron like me to make things like this. There's a little bit of a learning curve to it, but after a while you figure it out. A lot of the time it's more a logic puzzle than anything else, with "hmm how will I make this thing? I know, I'll use these shapes. Now how will I get it to align perfectly? I know, I'll build a box of the right height, then use the align tool and align it to the edge of the box."

There are also a few shortcuts that are bafflingly not explained anywhere (I only learned them when I stumbled upon their youtube page which just had them as part of the videos as if you were supposed to know them already) which make it easier to use, like F to focus on the selected object.

It's nowhere near as complicated as something like Blender, which gives me a headache trying to learn. As far as I can tell there's no way to easily align things in Blender, which means despite being an infinitely better program, it's pretty useless for me when it comes to 3D printing. I can't even import files from Tinkercad because somehow its vertices are completely different than Blender's and I can't use them that way.

It does seem to be good for modelling irregular shapes that I don't have measurements for though, like the telepathic circuits on 12's console. But from past experience, I'd be willing to bet that Tinkercad can't import the files made in blender somehow because of some stupid reason.


I've been saying the exact same things about TinkerCAD myself.
I'm not particularly skilled at 3D sculpting, so TinkerCAD's almost overly simplistic interface is about all that I can handle, and yeah... it's stupid that pretty much every other CAD program out there doesn't include the same basic "align this thing to a grid and use a toggle to adjust how far you want it to jump around when you move it" controls. Objects floating in space with zero reference points don't do anybody any good.

The only other tools that I use with any regularity are 3D Builder and Meshmixer, which you may want to check out, if you haven't already. (We should really start a '3D modeling tips and tricks' thread just for tips we've picked up along the way. I didn't know about the F to Focus thing either until you mentioned it just now)

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3D Builder either comes pre-bundled with Windows 10 or it's a free Microsoft app you can download from the Microsoft store.
Either way, the most useful feature it has is that it'll very quickly open up OBJ and STL files on your hard drive when you double click on them, so if you've got a whole folder full of pieces and parts, it's quite handy to be able to preview files before you import them into TinkerCAD.

The second most useful thing is does is the "simplify" tool, which provides a simple slide bar for reducing overall polygon counts. If you have an object that's too large or complex to import back into TinkerCAD, this can fix it for you, though it's logic for what polygons to reduce can be pretty idiotic at times. There's probably better out there, but it's free, and at least the interface is simple enough. I often use this to reset TinkerCAD's object history and "lock" multi-shape objects together so they'll load faster in TinkerCAD without getting those annoying red "cannot load" lines or having to go off and brew a pot of tea while waiting for the entire ghost history of every single shape I added or subtracted from an object flicker on the screen when opening a design or hitting the undo button.

You can also use it to slice up larger files, though only along a single plane at a time. Again, this can be useful when you have something that's too big to import into TinkerCAD directly. I primarily use this feature for "kit-bashing" complex textures, like taking the fur used for the Yeti off a free Rat model I found over on Thingiverse, or part of a dwarf's beard, which later became the wild matted hair of the Taran Wood Beast.


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Meshmixer is the only actual 3D-sculpting tool I've so far been able to wrap my head around. It's also free, so I don't feel quite so bad when it doesn't work exactly the way I want it to.

The first thing I do in Meshmixer is go up under view and switch it to wireframe. I primarily use it for the sculpt tool, with the refine, reduce, inflate, and robust smooth options. There's also toggles down in the refinement section that will allow you to refine or reduce the polygon count on your brush area.
Using these tools requires a lot of trial and error and hitting the Ctrl-Z button to undo whatever you just screwed up. On the plus side, it's very useful for hiding TinkerCADs shortcomings when it comes to producing very obviously polygoned shapes, and making objects look more organic. I used this quite a bit on the Wirrn to smooth out the ugly blocky textures of the original wireframe (see below). Usually I run the refine brush over the object, then possibly the inflate tool on very low power to create some deliberate organic irregularities in the surface, then the reduce tool to reduce the polygon count to a more manageable level. In wireframe mode, it's pretty easy to see which areas you've increased the polygon count and which have lower polygon counts.

While I would never be able to use this to sculpt actual faces, for objects like the Voord's head, which has a complex organic shape but not as complex as a human face, I've found that I can add approximate shapes in TinkerCAD to get the basic blocky structure in place, import into Meshmixer, smoosh it around, smooth over any gaps and remove the rough edges, then reimport back into TinkerCAD, rinse, and repeat. It's not pretty, but it gets the job done.

The only major downside to using Meshmixer is that if you get your brush anywhere near a square, straight edge, or a hole, the wireframe will immediately go crazy and screw it up. If your object's going to have a mix of organic and geometric parts, you sort of have to plan accordingly and get all the smooth organic bits done first before you insert the geometric pieces or holes, or get really creative with merging the old and new versions of the object together when you import back into TinkerCAD.

Still, as far as sculpting tools go, it's a lot more user friendly than any other software I've tried, and it imports and exports objects as OBJ or STL files without any fuss, so other than keeping an eye on the polygon count, it's pretty easy to jump back and forth between the two.

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